Skip to main content

After the Hysterectomy - Fast Facts about Sex and Side Effects


If you're experiencing painful sex after a hysterectomy, help is on the way! Keep reading!

Hysterectomy Facts

What is a Hysterectomy?

A hysterectomy is the surgery to remove just the uterus (womb).

What does a Hysterectomy treat?

It is a surgical procedure to treat diseases like fibroids, endometriosis, and cancers such as uterine and cervical cancers.

How does a Hysterectomy affect my sex life?

If only the uterus is removed, it often does not affect sexual activity. You just need to refrain from sex for about six weeks after the surgery. Once the surgical wound heals, you can resume normal sexual activity as before. However, there are some exceptions:

50% of Hysterectomies include Bilateral Oophorectomy

For about half of all hysterectomies in the United States, the ovaries are removed along with the uterus, especially when the procedure is a part of cancer treatment. This procedure is called bilateral oophorectomy.

Why Remove Ovaries?

I think we can all agree that ovaries are pretty neat, so why would anyone remove them?
The main reason is cancer prevention:
Estrogen promotes cancers associated with female reproductive tissues:
  • breast cancer
  • ovarian cancer
  • uterine cancer
  • cervical cancer
Removing ovaries eliminates the source of estrogen and thus helps prevent these hormone-sensitive cancers for survivors and women with a family history of breast, ovarian, uterine and cervical cancers.
So you may think that removing your ovaries is all sunshine and rainbows, however:

Hysterectomies can cause Female Sex Dysfunction

The tradeoff of removing ovaries is that you also lose the glands that produce sex hormones, like testosterone and estrogen.

Testosterone, the Libido Hormone

Testosterone is a male hormone but it is also produced in lesser amounts in the female and is thought to promote the female sexual desire.

Estrogen, the Sex Hormone

Estrogen maintains health of all female reproductive tissues, including vaginal tissue, keeping it thick, moist and flexible.

How much of your Testosterone and Estrogen is made by the Ovaries?

The ovaries produce about half of testosterone and nearly all of estrogen for women.

What happens to your sex life after removing ovaries?

When ovaries are removed after a total hysterectomy:
  • estrogen is substantially reduced
  • vaginal tissue becomes:
    1. thinner
    2. dryer
    3. more vulnerable to tear during intercourse
  • libido and sexual desire is decreased
  • arousal is altered because
    1. vaginal lubrication is reduced
    2. vaginal dilation is reduced
  • inability to achieve orgasm
  • dyspareunia (uncomfortable or painful sex)

Estrogen cannot be used by Hysterectomy Patients

Supplementing estrogen in theory can help you to find relief, but:
It is ACTUALLY a Catch-22 situation because estrogen can increase your risk for cancer. This is the very reason that your ovaries were removed in the first place!
It's a dilemma.
There is some good news, though:
You're not alone.
About half of all women with hysterectomies in the United States are suffering from various degrees of sexual dysfunction and they cannot use estrogen to find relief.

What about testosterone?

Since estrogen cannot be used in these women who had a hysterectomy, can testosterone help treat their sexual dysfunction?
The answer is “Not really.”

Does Sexual Arousal start in the Brain?

It is currently believed that in a healthy woman, the sexual arousal begins in the brain.
A romantic memory, image, scent, music, or fantasy may act as a trigger to prompt sexual arousal.
As a result, it was believed that female sexual dysfunction is a chain reaction occurs top-down from the brain to the lower parts of the body.
A lack of testosterone would result in decreased libido in the brain.
Subsequently, altered arousal and absent orgasm would follow.
Thus, the brain was thought to be the key and starting place for treating female sexual dysfunction.

Effects of Testosterone on Female Libido

Based on this belief, doctors have used testosterone to treat female sexual dysfunction, but the efficacy has been limited while side effects are significant.
As a result, the American Endocrine Society has recommended against using testosterone to treat women with sexual dysfunction.

Non-hormonal Choices

    There are many non-hormonal approaches that can help women with sexual dysfunction:
  • vaginal lubricants
  • vaginal moisturizers
  • vaginal dilators
  • laser treatment (MonaLisa Touch)
  • simple nutritional supplement, such as vitamin E suppository
  • advanced nutritional supplement such as NeuEve suppositories and cream
These products are available over the counter and do not require prescriptions. Women can find a product suitable for their age and health condition for long-term use.

Analysis of Non-hormonal Choices

Lubricants, moisturizers and vitamin E suppositories can provide temporary relief for women with early stage vaginal atrophy.
However, these products cannot stop or reverse vaginal atrophy.
Once the vaginal atrophy progresses to late stage these products become useless.
Dilators and laser treatment can help strengthen the vaginal tissue by providing physical stimulation, but these methods may require more work or carry a higher price.

NeuEve - The Best Choice

A desirable non-hormonal option is NeuEve’s advanced nutritional supplement.
It reverses vaginal atrophy by providing a group of nutrients to the vaginal tissue like calcium and vitamin D for bones.
To date, more than 50,000 women, including many with hysterectomy, have used this method safely and successfully for relief of vaginal atrophy.
The oldest woman who has regained sexual ability with NeuEve is 83 years old.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Four Reasons Why NeuEve Does NOT Contain Boric Acid

Boric Acid crystals (H3BO3) NeuEve cares deeply about the health and wellness of our customers. The ingredients we use reflect our belief in the scientific healing power of wholesome, natural ingredients. We strongly recommend against using boric acid vaginal suppositories, for these four reasons:
Boric acid is a pesticide.Boric acid is poisonous to humans.Boric acid is an environmental pollutant.Boric acid actually makes bacterial vaginosis worse. What you read next may surprise you:
Boric acid is a pesticide. Boric acid has the nickname "the gift that keeps on killing." Cockroaches coming in contact with boric acid get an effect like shards of glass slowly cutting them apart. A tiny bit of boric acid can wipe out an entire whole roach colony, something even atomic bombs can't do. [1]
Boric acid is poisonous to humans. In 1988, in a tragic accident at a festival in Malaysia, 13 children died from food poisoning after they ate a dish containing boric acid. Their s…

Where to Buy NeuEve in Plymouth, MA

Healthy Appetites Natural Foods sells NeuEve and is located in Plymouth, MA. Healthy Appetites is run by Jeff and Ilene Hills. They have over 20 years of experience helping their customers with perimenopause and menopause. We highly recommend that you check them out. They were voted Best Nutrition Center by South Shore Living Magazine in 2012, 2014 and 2016! Address: 44 Long Pond Rd.
Plymouth, MA 02360
Phone: (508) 747-8100 Hours: Monday–Friday 9am–6pm
Saturday 9am–5pm
Closed Sunday Website: http://healthyappetites.com/Facebook Page Here's what some of their thousands of happy customers have to say about them: Beautiful store, infinite knowledge, and owners who live what they sell, a path to a healthier life...definitely go visit them!This is the type of Health food store everyone dreams about! They are knowledgeable and share that information in order to help, not just to make a buck.