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Overcome Vaginismus Quickly, Effectively and Permanently

What is vaginismus?

Vaginismus is a condition with painful spasmodic contraction of the vagina in response to physical contact or pressure (especially in sexual intercourse). When a woman has vaginismus, her vagina's muscles squeeze or spasm when something is entering it, like a tampon or a penis. It can be mildly uncomfortable, or it can be painful.

What are the symptoms?

Painful sex is often a woman's first sign that she has vaginismus. The pain happens only with penetration. It usually goes away after withdrawal.

Many women who have vaginismus also feel discomfort when inserting a tampon or during a doctor's internal pelvic exam.

What causes it?

Doctors don't know exactly what causes vaginismus. It's often associated with anxiety and fear of having sex. Past traumas or painful sex might or overly sensitive nerves may contribute to the cause.

Current treatments are palliative

  • Kegel exercises: squeezing muscles you use to stop the flow of urine when urinating.
  • Botox: a nerve toxin to reduce the sensitivity of the pelvic floor muscles.
  • Lidocaine: a pain-killer to numb the vaginal tissue.
  • Psychological therapy and antidepressants: to control anxiety.

So far, most of these treatments are palliative remedies that do not provide a long-term cure.

NeuEve: A natural remedy of vaginismus

Since its inception 3 years ago, NeuEve has helped >50,000 women with painful sex to find relief. These include hundreds of women with severe vaginismus who have tried all methods or products under the sun without effect. So far, the success rate of NeuEve in relieving symptoms of vaginismus has been near 100%. Although it is unknown what the exact mechanism is, the good news is that NeuEve provides a safe, effective and rapid relief to women with vaginismus.

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